Read Cultivating and Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher by Frederick L. Kirschenmann Constance L. Falk Online

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Theologian, academic, and certified Biodynamic farmer Frederick L. Kirschenmann is a celebrated agricultural thinker. In the last thirty years he has tirelessly promoted the principles of sustainability and has become a legend in his own right. Kirschenmann was a keynote speaker at the 2010 Biodynamic National Conference. Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from aTheologian, academic, and certified Biodynamic farmer Frederick L. Kirschenmann is a celebrated agricultural thinker. In the last thirty years he has tirelessly promoted the principles of sustainability and has become a legend in his own right. Kirschenmann was a keynote speaker at the 2010 Biodynamic National Conference. Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher documents Kirschenmann's evolution and his lifelong contributions to the new agrarianism in a collection of his greatest writings on farming, philosophy, and sustainability. Working closely with agricultural economist and editor Constance L. Falk, Kirschenmann recounts his intellectual and spiritual journey. In a unique blend of personal history, philosophical discourse, spiritual ruminations, and practical advice, Kirschenmann interweaves his insights with discussion of contemporary agrarian topics. This collection serves as an invaluable resource to agrarian scholars and introduces readers to an agricultural pioneer whose work has profoundly influenced modern thinking about food....

Title : Cultivating and Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher
Author :
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ISBN : 9780813125787
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 403 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Cultivating and Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher Reviews

  • Pearse Anderson
    2018-10-19 20:45

    A hard book to rate, because Kirschenmann covers so much ground and so many years. His material ranges from more intro-ENVS to the ultra-specific, like if to castrate pigs when they are sedated. I really wanted more of the latter, partially because those kinds of stories make me want to learn more, rather than the less specific "we can fix the system" message than many environmentalists shout that isn't very motivating. Overall, I could tell Kirschenmann was a really smart dude with a lot of smart things to say, about other people, farming, and life in general.Connections: Kirschenmann is the president of the Stone Barns Center, which I volunteered for in the summer of 2016. I got a signed copy!

  • Katie/Doing Dewey
    2018-11-02 02:35

    Farmer-philosopher Frederick Kirschenmann's Cultivating an Ecological Conscience is a collection of thoughtful essays about the "ethical and practical principles" of developing a sustainable agricultural system. Drawing on his experiences as a theologian and a farmer, he delivers a series of measured arguments that a shift to more sustainable agriculture is a necessary change. As I mentioned in my Monday Musing, this was a welcome break from the rhetoric some other authors depend on. It is clear that the author is a product of a true liberal arts education, with a gift for elocution (I would love to hear him speak!) and a deep knowledge of the classics. I was at times astounded by the variety of sources he drew on to support his economic and agricultural theories - everything from Adam Smith to Machiavelli. I think the fact that he has read such different works and thought about their connection to agriculture is truly indicative of his passion for the topic.Read more here...

  • Happyreader
    2018-10-31 22:33

    Frederick Kirschenmann’s talk at the 2008 FamilyFarmed Expo was an expo highlight for me and he very generously e-mailed me many more resources after the talk. I imagine that any book of his will be informed and inspirational. The book will include his article Food as Relationship published last year in the Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition From that article: "Today, we are discovering the dysfunctional aspects of our tendency to reduce food to a thing rather than appreciating it as a relationship. The constant stream of (sometimes conflicting) recommendations suggesting that if we eat a sufficient amount of a particular ingredient (remember oat bran?) we will all be healthy is but one example of this disconnect with nature. Our failure to explore intertwined relationships between soil health and human health is yet another example of this same skewed food culture."

  • Jeffrey
    2018-11-16 01:43

    Some powerful stories to have discussions around. He brings to the table many thought provoking ideas and assumptions. Many are assumptions tossed around today and Fred puts them in a sound light. A theologian and farmer, he brings wonderful insights forward in his book. With so much emphasis on where our food comes from, these essays and much to the conversation.

  • Dick
    2018-10-24 04:44

    Amazing..... should be required reading for all decision makers in Agriculture.