Read Voices of the Self: A Study of Language Competence by Keith Gilyard Online

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A unique blend of memoir and scholarship, Keith Gilyard's Voices of the Self is a penetrating analysis of the linguistic and cultural "collision" experienced by African-American students in the public education system. Gilyard examines black students "negotiate" their way through school and discusses the tension between the use of Black English and Standard English, underlA unique blend of memoir and scholarship, Keith Gilyard's Voices of the Self is a penetrating analysis of the linguistic and cultural "collision" experienced by African-American students in the public education system. Gilyard examines black students "negotiate" their way through school and discusses the tension between the use of Black English and Standard English, underlining how that tension is representative of the deeper conflict that exists between black culture and white expectations. Vivid descriptions--often humorous, sometimes disturbing, always moving--of Gilyard's own childhood experiences in school and society are interlaced with chapters of solid sociolinguistic scholarship. Encompassing the perspectives of both the "street" and the "academy," Voices of the Self presents an eloquent argument for cultural and linguistic pluralism in American public schools....

Title : Voices of the Self: A Study of Language Competence
Author :
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ISBN : 9780814322253
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 177 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Voices of the Self: A Study of Language Competence Reviews

  • Joe Santoli
    2018-12-10 12:16

    Read for class. It was an interesting take on language, kind of a study in linguistics and learning styles intertwined with the story of a young african american man.

  • Kara Poe Alexander
    2018-11-12 09:54

    Gilyard's book has become a classic in the field of rhetoric and composition. His unique blend of narrative and analysis sheds light on his ideas in concrete ways. I highly recommend this for all educators.

  • Anna
    2018-11-25 10:03

    So it's hard for me to say exactly how I felt about this book. At times I really enjoyed reading Gilyard's narrative. But then sometimes I felt frustrated because the book felt kind of choppy and then would drag. And then I felt myself getting annoyed with Keith for making some poor decisiosn. Yet those poor decisions also helped me better understand him and African American boys in general. So I didn't love all parts of this book but I appreciate what he tried to do by writing it. I think this book is worth reading if you're looking to get some insight into Black English and, more specifically, the challenges facing education of black males in America. the book is set in the 60s and was originally published in the 90s so it's slightly dated but still seemed pretty relevant. In the end I was kind of disappointed by the small role that language played in his writing. But I was also intrigued by a lot of his personal anecdotes and ideas about teaching, learning, education, and survival.

  • Lauren Elizabeth
    2018-11-27 06:51

    Gilyard's work offers an excellent insight into HIS experience and the experience of many Black students in the U.S. in terms of schooling, discipline, and learning how to use the master's tools (language and identity discourse) in order to succeed.It is a memoir-scholarly work-narrative fusion. He uses his own experiences and speaks back to them using academic scholarship and commentary. Is the work perfect? No. But it was never intended to be. It is his memoir and for those wishing to hear more about what it was like for a Black man in NY to go to a predominantly White school, or for Black students who are struggling (even if not visibly) while straddling multiple voices and identities, this is a great read.

  • Bruce Martin
    2018-12-01 05:59

    I'm familiar with his writing strategy here -- mixing personal narrative with a discussion of the then-current scholarship. The narratives are poignant and telling, but a) his discussion of the scholarship is light and rarely critical, while b) his ties to the narrative and scholarship are often tenuous. This would be an acceptable undergrad introduction to demonstrate memoir and qualitative research, but it lacks the weightiness needed for a critical examination as to how place, society, environment, and systems affect/reflect language.

  • Daniel
    2018-11-14 09:21

    good, his critique of Richard Rodriguez was interesting too. I think Gilyard assigns priority to personal agency than structural hegemony, the former to which Rodriguez subscribes.