Read Vote Your Conscience: Party Must Not Trump Principles by Brian Kaylor Online

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The 2016 presidential election provides voters with the two least popular nominees in polling history. Both come with a record of ethical scandals, flip-flops, and outright lies. Yet, many pastors and Christian leaders willingly risk their credibility and witness by publicly endorsing one of these flawed candidates simply because of party affiliation. Donald Trump's vulgarThe 2016 presidential election provides voters with the two least popular nominees in polling history. Both come with a record of ethical scandals, flip-flops, and outright lies. Yet, many pastors and Christian leaders willingly risk their credibility and witness by publicly endorsing one of these flawed candidates simply because of party affiliation. Donald Trump's vulgar, bigoted, violent, authoritarian, and racist rhetoric and policies stand in stark opposition to biblical teachings. We must be politically engaged, but we must do so without ignoring our consciences and throwing away our principles. In this book, award-winning author Brian Kaylor addresses the moral issues at stake in the 2016 election, explores how the Christian faith became too closely tied to partisan politics, and considers the alternative political engagement called for in scripture. This book also includes practical steps to help Christians offer much-needed prophetic politics during this and future campaigns....

Title : Vote Your Conscience: Party Must Not Trump Principles
Author :
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ISBN : 9781945870019
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 226 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Vote Your Conscience: Party Must Not Trump Principles Reviews

  • Robert D. Cornwall
    2018-12-18 02:14

    It is always dangerous when religion becomes overly entangled with politics. That doesn't mean that people of faith, including Christians, shouldn't get involved in public life, but there is often a fine line between what is appropriate and what is inappropriate. Unfortunately, too often we find ourselves beholden to party, and that party trumps principles (to paraphrase the subtitle of this book by Brian Kaylor).Brian Kaylor is a journalist and author of several books on the intersection of religion and politics. "Vote Your Conscience" is his latest offering and it is an attempt to give some perspective on the upcoming 2016 presidential election, which poses a number of challenges to people of faith. Kaylor's major concern, and I think the reason for releasing what is a self-published book, is the embrace by white evangelicals of Donald Trump. Throughout the book, Kaylor throws a barb at Hillary Clinton, but that seems to be more an attempt to be "balanced" than it is a full fledged analysis of her politics and apparent ethical lapses. He does acknowledge that of the two major party candidates Hillary Clinton is more likely a Christian than is Donald Trump. As someone who has deep concerns about the prospect of a Trump presidency, and as one who supports Hillary Clinton, I found myself at times in full agreement and at other times in disagreement. My concern is that while his analysis of Trump's candidacy, which has been marked by statements that should give Christians pause before supporting him -- his vulgarity, name-calling, anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim rants, embrace of torture, just to name a few issues and behaviors where he falls short -- has received close attention, his analysis of Clinton's ethical lapses seem to be based more on Republican talking points. Like I said, I intend to vote for Hillary, so I'm a bit sensitive to how she is portrayed. Nonetheless, this book can be a useful primer on ways in which we might approach the upcoming elections. It is important that we keep our allegiances in the proper order. No candidate and no party will completely align with our faith positions and principles, but we should bring our ethical vision into the conversation. Principle should stand above party. Kaylor reminds us that ours is a kingdom vision. This is an important word for churches who can be tempted to become political tools, usually as a result of promises of power and influence. This is a helpful book because raises important questions. I would recommend that it be read in partnership with David Gushee's A Letter to My Anxious Christian Friends: From Fear to Faith in Unsettled Times, which is also written first and foremost to white evangelical Christians. While a significant majority of white evangelical Christians seem to have been joined in marriage with the GOP (Brian has an interesting discussion of the use of marriage language to describe the partnership on the part of evangelical leaders such as Richard Land), liberal/Progressive Christians can also become overly entangled with the Democratic Party (though on the left end there is more talk of third party participation). Kaylor, like Gushee, raises the possibility of voting third party, especially if one lives in a state where such a vote won't tip the election in one way or another (that is, if you don't live in a battle-ground state you might want to vote third party, to send a message to the two major parties.)Perhaps after the election is over there will be room for a post-mortem that will reveal the value of putting some distance between church and party. In the meantime, we can vote our principles, even if there is no perfect choice.