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In 1991, the leaders of the Somali National Movement and elders of the northern Somali clans proclaimed the new Republic of Somaliland. Since then, in contrast to the complete collapse of Somalia, Somaliland has successfully managed a process of reconciliation, demobilization, and restoration of law and order. They have held three successful democratic elections and the caIn 1991, the leaders of the Somali National Movement and elders of the northern Somali clans proclaimed the new Republic of Somaliland. Since then, in contrast to the complete collapse of Somalia, Somaliland has successfully managed a process of reconciliation, demobilization, and restoration of law and order. They have held three successful democratic elections and the capital, Hargeysa, has become an active international trading center. Despite this display of good governance in Africa, Somaliland has yet to be recognized by the international community. International efforts have been directed toward the reunification of Somalia, which has failed, even after 14 peace conferences and international military intervention. Warlords continue to overrun and destabilize southern Somalia while Somaliland works to build peace, stability, and democracy. How long will it be before this African success story achieves the recognition it deserves?...

Title : Becoming Somaliland: Reconstructing a Failed State
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ISBN : 9780253219978
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 200 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Becoming Somaliland: Reconstructing a Failed State Reviews

  • Nicholas Whyte
    2018-12-27 21:30

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/1093877.html[return][return]Bradbury has done a good job here of untangling the complex set of politics and conflict which have led to the former British colony of Somaliland repudiating its 1960 union with the neighbouring Italian colony, and instead constructing a home-grown democracy, despite its non-recognition by the international community and generally chaotic neighbourhood. Somaliland remains a very poor country, crucially dependent on exporting its cattle across the Gulf of Aden (with mineral resources now coming into the picture as well); yet it has managed to overcome internal conflict and build a robust democratic system with only minimal engagement from the outside world (which has instead wasted its time empowering warlords from the east and south of the disintegrated Somalia).[return][return]One of the interesting facets of Somaliland's development has been the process of introducing democratic structures to a clan-based and partly nomadic society, particularly because one often hears the assertion that some cultures are simply not suited to democracy. The contrast between Somaliland and the other Somalis in the neighbourhood demonstrates that it really isn't a matter of culture, it is a question of leadership.[return][return]That leadership has been provided in large part by the Guurti, the upper house of parliament which consists of nominated clan elders, and still retains immense political credibility in comparison with the elected lower house and perhaps even the president. Yet one must remember that this is a work in progress; the lower house was only elected for the first time in 2005 (and elections due this year were postponed because of the immense technical difficulties of organising them).

  • Aurélien Thomas
    2018-12-24 03:34

    Emerging out of the civil war that has been engulfing Somalia ever since 1991, Somaliland is a challenge to all our preconceptions of what makes a country a state, what is a modern democracy or, again, a model of successful economic development. The fact such a country, not even recognised (yet?) by the international community, managed to build itself up in about two decades only and nearly without any foreign intervention, while its neighbour down south (that is, Somalia itself) still remains one of the worst place to be on the planet, might be a case-study where a lot of lessons could be learnt on how to and not to deal with African nations in order to help sustain their development.Indeed, by not only recounting here the whole process that led to the creation of Somaliland but, also, balancing that history against what happened in Somalia during the same timeframe, Mark Bradbury offers a very insightful contrast which is way more than telling. He is, however, far from being naïve. He perfectly recognises that the road to a brighter future might not be clear yet for such a small and young nation as, it still has a lot of challenges to face (gain political recognition, maintain a sustainable economy, fight radical Islam). But, its success so far that is, maintaining democracy, stability and peace in a region torn apart by civil war and terrorism is itself a feat that deserves to be look into.Here is a scholarly, complex and dense book, but at the image of the country it depicts -engrossing and fascinating.

  • Safia
    2019-01-18 03:41

    Mark BradburySafia Becoming Somaliland:This Book is an amazing book, providing Somaliland History from the British Colonial up to the 2008, and detailed Somaliland elections including the first Somaliland Presidential election took place. Becoming Somaliland is a resourceful reading to every foreign person who desires to understand the complicated Somaliland history. In addition, it is valuable reference and document for Somaliland community – I would say this should be added to Somaliland Curriculum after little editing.The Author Explained Somaliland history in details, in ten comprehensive chapters, including peace and state building process in Somaliland. The Author explained Somaliland clans’ lineage, and traditional role of the peace building process in Somaliland – What I liked more is how the author detailed the ongoing situation in Somaliland e.g.: different elections, corruptions, government budget management. Though the Author considered and debated Somaliland history very well, but there is some mix-up regarding Somaliland traditional system, where some of that tradition came from and based on Islam practice, like “diya” which the Author explained in chapter one page 16. He stated and explained that “diya” payment is a traditional practice, while “diya” is actually an Islamic way for preventing violence and it exists in the Muslim states like Saudi Arabia. What is traditional is the way that Somalilanders practice, the collaboration of diya payment ( the sub-clans pay and receive diya together). The Book has some repetitions that is either bores or confuses the reader. In a way or another, the Author explained couple of times in different chapters the peace conferences, that took place in Somaliland. For instance, Peace building processes mentioned in different chapters (1-6) while it explained in different sub-titles and roles, but still the information remains the same, which bothers the reader. Generally, the book is useful and very good, I would recommend to everyone who wishes to know or understand Somaliland.

  • Yusuph Dualeh
    2018-12-27 22:28

    Great work by Mark Bradbury ..very interesting and educative book - a must read.