Read Dark Woods: Cults, Crime, and the Paranormal in the Freetown State Forest, Massachusetts by Christopher Balzano Online

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Throughout its long history, Freetown, Massachusetts, has been a hotbed of criminal and supernatural occurrences in the towns State Forest. This is the first account of how its darker side connects hauntings with violent crime and local cults. Native American ghosts roam here and evil lurks, making the forest a haven for nasty creatures (the Pukwudgies). A witch looks forThroughout its long history, Freetown, Massachusetts, has been a hotbed of criminal and supernatural occurrences in the towns State Forest. This is the first account of how its darker side connects hauntings with violent crime and local cults. Native American ghosts roam here and evil lurks, making the forest a haven for nasty creatures (the Pukwudgies). A witch looks for favors from young men, satan cults thrive, and killers kill. Read first-hand accounts from police officials and criminals about the forest. Learn why hauntings continue today. Many come here to enjoy the beauty of Freetown State Forest; these are the stories of those who cannot leave....

Title : Dark Woods: Cults, Crime, and the Paranormal in the Freetown State Forest, Massachusetts
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780764327995
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 184 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Dark Woods: Cults, Crime, and the Paranormal in the Freetown State Forest, Massachusetts Reviews

  • EJ
    2018-09-23 15:39

    I took a star off for something the author couldn't reeaaaalllly control. But let it serve as a warning to all who enter here! The editing on this. Is. Wretched. The worst. Misspellings, no justification, run on sentences. It was utterly distracting through the entire book. Which is a real shame, because really, the book itself, as in, it's content, was pretty good. I read this book in preparation for a haunted roadtrip and the Freetown Forest was a perfect place to take my trembling friends. Tales run the gamut between ghosts to monsters to Native American legends. Balzano does a great job of being objective and relaying stories that he's dug up from real people. I have always thought that something that's intended to be frightening should have a basis in reality. Thinking it could happen, makes it scary. If you can get past the wretched editing, you'll be rewarded with a great collection of stories from a truly beautiful, eerie, and uneasy part of Massachusetts.

  • James
    2018-10-14 09:43

    A volume of tales from the nearby Freetown forest. While one or two of the crimes was not familiar to me, this book will probably only interest someone who is completely unfamiliar with local stories or tales of ghosts. It's full of both weasel words (which makes some sense because many of the events described are impossible to believe) and elevates the dreams of some of its contributors to the same level as actual experiences they claim to have. I gave this review an extra star because it promotes interest in the local area, and is written by a local author. Some people will be really bothered by the lack of editing (it contained many of the types of errors which are not found by spell checkers) but I have no trouble putting up with that if a story is marginally creepy. But, really, when you're reading that some boys dreamed about a witch, is that really book-worthy? Who hasn't had strange dreams? At least it was such an easy read I never felt the need to put it down. On the bright side, I'd never heard of Pukwudgies before, mystical troll-like creatures who are said to inhabit the forest from before the time the Native Americans thrived here. Also on the bright side, the book reads as though you're hearing these stories over a beer at the local tavern, with not much more investigative rigor. I appreciated that, from time to time, the author admits you need to ignore all sorts of plausible explanations to believe some of the stories. I agree wholeheartedly. I would say this book might be good for budding local skeptics to cut their teeth on, examining just how vague a claim can be, and how wild writers can get with their suggestions that (to paraphrase) emotional energy can punch a hole from this universe into another.I've heard so much of it before, if not specifically happening in Freetown and southeastern Massachusetts. Perhaps I should not expect much from a book on the paranormal. If that is the case, then neither should you; perhaps seek out a book from which you can expect more. I was mildly entertained, but you probably will not be unless you're quite gullible or easily spooked.

  • Christine
    2018-10-17 09:30

    I have only read about 30 pages so far, and already two hysterical errors: one reference to the "dewy decimal system" and another to "antidotal evidence." Update: the editing/word usage errors continued throughout this book, including confusion of scared, sacred, scarred and too many others to mention. Did Mr. Balzano not have an editor, or even proofread his own work? It is especially frightening that he is apparently a teacher, according to comments on one of his YouTube videos.Mr. Balzano is all over the place, a paranormal/true crime omnivore, with references to a variety of paranormal concepts, including the ubiquitous "Indian burial ground," pugwudgies, geomancy, EVP, etc., and ending with a section on a satanic cult conspiracy. It is interesting that the Freetown State Forest has attracted a variety of unusual experiences. You can find other websites and YouTube videos about it, including it as part of the Bridgewater Triangle. You can also see Mr. Balzano's YouTube videos about phenomena in the area.

  • Ian Massey
    2018-10-04 08:45

    Grammatical errors abound, the author would often begin a thought only to move on to something different in the next sentence or paragraph without fully fleshing it out.and what appears to be a misuse of certain words simply because they sound similar to what would have been the correct term. Other than that, it's a good book, an easy read, and worth a look to anyone interested.