Read The First Mark by Peter Nadin Online

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"In THE FIRST MARK: UNLEARNING HOW TO MAKE ART, Peter Nadin uses the novella form to suggest a conceptual framework through which to understand his new series of paintings. The protagonist, Stint Arno, is a young, commercially successful artist who begins to unravel psychologically, undergoing a series of absurdist hallucinations until he finds the 'first mark,' the primor"In THE FIRST MARK: UNLEARNING HOW TO MAKE ART, Peter Nadin uses the novella form to suggest a conceptual framework through which to understand his new series of paintings. The protagonist, Stint Arno, is a young, commercially successful artist who begins to unravel psychologically, undergoing a series of absurdist hallucinations until he finds the 'first mark,' the primordial impulse behind all art. Nadin shifts between prose and poetry in an attempt to illustrate the movement from convention to the more organic mode of sensory experience that characterizes the 'first mark.' Much in the tradition of Joseph Mallord William Turner's poetry, or T.S. Eliot's notes for 'The Wasteland,' this novella is a companion to the paintings that will be shown at the Wifredo Lam Center in Havana, Cuba, in February 2007."...

Title : The First Mark
Author :
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ISBN : 1893207226
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 62 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The First Mark Reviews

  • Mike
    2018-12-05 13:32

    Peter Nadin taught a class called 'Science of the Mind' at Cooper Union in New York City. Does he still teach it? I don't know but if you can get your hands on this book you will taste the vibrancy of his approach. I feel like a friend just jumped into my head and said "Let's go back to the beginning. Let's deal with all of it in sixty-two pages. C'mon - Art was and is Real and it exists outside the financial sector... it exists outside of history even!" Stint Arno, the Satyr, the stone monkey, the stigmata hands, the shifty agent who is dying from a bronze cast-of-a-hoagie-induced head wound, the protagonist's dream about Jack Kerouac hating him... this is good stuff. I wish I had read this during Peter's class and probed him for more reading material because he knows a hell of a lot and doesn't let it sit on a shelf in his labyrinthine mind collecting dust. He is a great artist and writer and I think he spends much of his time in another dimension. This book is a short accompaniment to some paintings he made (haven't seen them) and will make you question every movement in art (are movements in art real?), every mark and its deeper meaning. Or maybe you'll hate Stint Arno and his hallucinations.